New Urban Politics and the Right To The City

VENEZUELA: What’s happening? What’s next?

WHERE:
King Juan Carlos I of Spain Center
Washington Square South
New York, NY , USA
WHEN:
Monday, February 11, 6:30pm9:00pm
 

For years Venezuela has been mired in a seemingly unending crisis – political impasse, economics chaos, social upheaval. Yet over the past two weeks that crisis appears, at last, to have reached a tipping point. A notoriously fractious opposition has rallied behind a single, youthful leader – Juan Guaidó – who has won the recognition and support of most of the western world. Meanwhile despite growing popular discontent even among former chavista strongholds, Nicolas Maduro remains in power with the support of the military as well as global players like Russia, China, and Turkey. As the stalemate grows and the crisis deepens, what possible futures are in store for Venezuela and it’s people? Is open war on the table? What role should the international community play? And how are Venezuelans themselves responding? Join us for a conversation on the latest from Venezuela.

About the speakers:

Beatriz Borges is the Executive Director of The Justice and Peace Center (CEPAZ), a non-profit organization that works to promote and defend democratic values, human rights, and a culture of peace in Venezuela. CEPAZ’s main areas of action include the promotion of public policies and good government practices with respect to human rights, litigation before international bodies that protect human rights, and the use of information and communications technologies in the human rights field. She is a professor and researcher at the Center for Human Rights of the Universidad Católica Andrés Bello, where she researches international systems for the protection of human rights.

Dorothy Kronick is Assistant Professor of Political Science at University of Pennsylvania. Her research focuses on Comparative political economy, comparative political behavior, electoral politics of crime, Latin American politics, Venezuelan politics, and quantitative methods. She has published articles about Venezuela on various publications such as New York Times, Caracas Chronicles, The New Republic, Hispanic American Center for Economic Research, among others.

Francisco Rodríguez is Chief Economist and Managing Director at Torino Capital. Previously, he was director and senior Andean economist at Bank of America Merrill Lynch. Rodríguez has held numerous positions in academia and public policy. Between 2000 and 2004 he headed the Venezuelan Congressional Budget Office. He has taught economics at the University of Maryland at College Park, Wesleyan University, and the Instituto de Estudios Superiores de Administración in Caracas. Between 2008 and 2011, Rodríguez served as head of research at the Human Development Report Office at the UN Development Program. His research has been published in journals such as Foreign Affairs, American Economic Journal, and Journal of Economic Growth. He is the co-author of Venezuela before Chávez (Penn State University Press, 2012) He holds a PhD in economics from Harvard University.

Christopher Sabatini is an adjunct professor at the School of International and Public Affairs (SIPA) at Columbia University, the founder and executive director of the new research non-profit, Global Americans and the editor of its news and opinion website www.LatinAmericaGoesGlobal.org. With support from the National Endowment for Democracy and the Ford Foundation, Global Americans conducts research on social inclusion and foreign policy and democracy and human rights. In September 2015 he was recognized as the best professor of a small class in SIPA.

From 2005 to 2014, he was the senior director of policy at the Americas Society and Council of the Americas (AS/COA) and the founder and editor-in-chief of the hemispheric policy magazine Americas Quarterly (AQ). At the AS/COA, Dr. Sabatini chaired the organization’s Rule of Law working group. He also chaired the AS/COA Cuba Working Group. From 1997 to 2005, Dr. Sabatini was the Director for Latin America and the Caribbean at the National Endowment for Democracy. From 1995 to 1997, he was a Diplomacy Fellow with the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and has served as an advisor to the World Bank and the U.S. Agency for International Development.

About the moderators:

Patricio Navia is Clinical (Full) Professor of Liberal Studies and Adjunct Assistant Professor in the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies at New York University. Navia is also a Professor of Political Science at Universidad Diego Portales in Chile. Ph.D. in Politics from New York University, an M.A. in Political Science from the University of Chicago and a B.A. in Political Sciences and Sociology from the University of Illinois at Chicago. He has been a visiting professor at Princeton University, New School University, Universidad de Salamanca, Universidad de Chile and NYU Buenos Aires, and a visiting fellow at the University of Miami. He has published scholarly articles and book chapters on democratization, electoral rules and democratic institutions in Latin America. As founding director of Observatorio Electoral at Universidad Diego Portales, he has co-edited Democracia Municipal (2012), El sismo electoral de 2009. Cambio y continuidad en las preferencias políticas de los chilenos (2010) and El genoma electoral chileno. Dibujando el mapa genético de las preferencias políticas en Chile (2009). His books Diccionario de la política chilena (with Alfredo Joignant and Francisco Javier Díaz), El díscolo. Conversaciones con Marco Enríquez-Ominami (2009), Que gane el más mejor: Mérito y Competencia en el Chile de hoy (with Eduardo Engel, 2006) and Las grandes alamedas: El Chile post Pinochet (2004) have been best sellers in Chile. He is a columnist in El Líbero in Chile, Buenos Aires Herald, and Infolatam.com. He has previously penned columns for La Tercera, Capital and Poder magazines in Chile, Perfil in Argentina.

Alejandro Velasco is a historian of modern Latin America whose research and teaching interests are in the areas of social movements, urban culture and democratization. His book, Barrio Rising: Urban Popular Politics and the Making of Modern Venezuela (University of California Press, 2015), couples archival and ethnographic research to examine how residents of Venezuela’s largest public housing community pursued full citizenship during the heyday of Latin America’s once-model democracy. Before joining the Gallatin faculty, Professor Velasco taught at Hampshire College, where he was a Five College Fellow, and at Duke University. His teaching record includes interdisciplinary courses on contemporary Latin America, including seminars on human rights, cultural studies, and urban social movements; historical methods courses on 20th-century revolutions; graduate history courses on urban political history and workshops with primary and secondary school educators. At Gallatin, his courses include “(Re)Imagining Latin America,” “¡Revolución!,” “Incivility in the Age of Civil Society,” and “Art and Politics in the City,” a multi-sited collaboration between NYU Buenos Aires and NYU Washington Square. Professor Velasco’s research has won major funding support from the Social Science Research Council, the American Historical Association, the Ford Foundation, and the Mellon Foundation, among others, and he has presented widely at both national and international conferences and symposia.

RSVP

New York University and Gallatin provide reasonable accommodations to people living with disabilities who wish to attend events at the School. For every event, Gallatin staff will be on hand to assist guests. Please note that the entrance at 715 Broadway is wheelchair accessible. To request accommodations, such as a sign language interpreter, assistive listening devices, or large print programs, or should you have questions regarding accessibility for an event, please contact Gallatin’s Office of Special Events by emailing events.gallatin@nyu.edu or by calling 212-992-6328. Should you need an accommodation, we ask that you send your request as early as possible so that we have time to fulfill your request.

 

Events

Rooted in Place: Stories of Home in the City

WHERE:
Museum of the City of New York
1220
5th Avenue, New York , NY
WHEN:
Thursday, February 28, 6:30pm8:30pm
 

Thursday, February 28 at 6:30 pm at the Museum of the City of New York

In a city driven by the real estate market, where every inch of space is a commodity, it can be easy to overlook the personal, felt experience of having a home – and the daily struggles for those whose concept of home is threatened or elusive. Explore the emotional and psychological dimensions of personal space, home-making, and connections to place in a non-stop city like New York with an evening of stories and discussion featuring:

Zaheer Ali, Oral historian at Brooklyn Historical Society (BHS)
Eric Bunge, co-founding principal of nARCHITECTS, a Brooklyn-based architecture firm
Dr. Mindy Fullilove, author of Root Shock: How Tearing Up City Neighborhoods Hurts America
Annie Ling, documentary photographer featured in our current exhibition Interior Lives
Tanvi Misra (moderator), staff writer for CityLab, the urban-focused site of The Atlantic

This program is co-presented by CityLab. 

$20 & up | $15 for Museum Members. Register online at mcny.org/future. Use code HOUSING1 for discounted tickets!

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Events

Urban Intersections: Black, Queer Lives in New York City

WHERE:
Jerry H. Labowitz Theatre for the Performing Arts
1 Washington Place
New York, NY , USA
WHEN:
Wednesday, February 27, 6:30pm8:00pm
 

Few calls to action have been as powerful in movement building as that of the Combahee River Collective in 1977. The collective, composed of Black feminists who identified as and with the working-class and lesbians, demanded an active commitment “to struggling against racial, sexual, heterosexual, and class oppression,” seeing as their “particular task the development of integrated analysis and practice based upon the fact that the major systems of oppression are interlocking.” Decades later, this intersectional politics helped buoy the Movement for Black lives, Black Lives Matter, Black Youth Project 100, and other 21st century campaigns for racial, gender, class, and sexual justice. In celebration of Black History Month, the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall Uprising, and the boundless, ongoing relevance of the Combahee River Collective’s message, this event brings together key activists working at the intersections of Black and queer politics in New York City.

Panelists: 

Kiara St. James, Co-Founder and ED of New York Trans Advocacy Group
Kleaver Cruz, Founder, The Black Joy Project
Jewel Cadet, Community Organizer with Black Youth Project 100

Moderated By: Ayasha Guerin, New York University, Doctoral Candidate, SCA and Urban Democracy Lab Doctoral Fellow in Urban Practice

 

Note: Our featured image is of Pauli Murray, lawyer, Civil Rights Activist, Episcopal Priest, and (briefly) New Yorker. Murray identified as a lesbian and a recent biographer described her retroactively as “transgender.”

RSVP

New York University and Gallatin provide reasonable accommodations to people living with disabilities who wish to attend events at the School. For every event, Gallatin staff will be on hand to assist guests. Please note that the entrance at 715 Broadway is wheelchair accessible. To request accommodations, such as a sign language interpreter, assistive listening devices, or large print programs, or should you have questions regarding accessibility for an event, please contact Gallatin’s Office of Special Events by emailing events.gallatin@nyu.edu or by calling 212-992-6328. Should you need an accommodation, we ask that you send your request as early as possible so that we have time to fulfill your request.

 

Events

Navigating the City/State Divide: What’s Next for Progressive Elected Officials?

WHERE:
Jerry H. Labowitz Theatre for the Performing Arts
1 Washington Place
New York, NY , USA
WHEN:
Wednesday, January 30, 6:30pm8:00pm
 

The Urban Democracy Lab and Metropolitics, an online journal of public scholarship about cities and urban politics, invite you to a discussion on how, in the context of more cautious, less activist state governments, progressive urban leaders can pursue inclusive, social equity-oriented public policies. What is the potential of local progressivism, and what are the challenges to implementing it? How can elected officials and their social movement allies collaborate at the city and state levels to organize governing coalitions that more consistently act on progressive values?

Panelists include:

Jumaane Williams,City Councilmember, District 45 Brooklyn, and recent candidate for NYC Public Advocate

Zephyr Teachout,  Fordham University professor and recent candidate for New York State Attorney General

Carlos Menchaca,New York City Councilmember, District 38 Brooklyn

Zellnor Myrie, New York State Senator, 20th Senate District Brooklyn

 

Moderated by Richard SchraggerPerre Bowen Professor of Law & Joseph C. Carter, Jr. Research Professor of Law. University of Virginia and author of City Power: Urban Governance in a Global Age (OUP, 2016)

This discussion grew out of Metropoliticsseries on Progressive Mayors and Urban Social Movements, which explores the structural and political challenges to implementing progressive urban agendas, within the contexts of growing metropolitan inequality, political and cultural divides, and social movements arising in response to these changes.

 

RSVP

New York University and Gallatin provide reasonable accommodations to people living with disabilities who wish to attend events at the School. For every event, Gallatin staff will be on hand to assist guests. Please note that the entrance at 715 Broadway is wheelchair accessible. To request accommodations, such as a sign language interpreter, assistive listening devices, or large print programs, or should you have questions regarding accessibility for an event, please contact Gallatin’s Office of Special Events by emailing events.gallatin@nyu.edu or by calling 212-992-6328. Should you need an accommodation, we ask that you send your request as early as possible so that we have time to fulfill your request.

 

Place, Displacement, & The Politics of Housing UDL Student Advisory Board

Teach-in: Capitalism & The City

WHERE:
NYU Gallatin
1 Washington Place
5th Floor Student Lounge, New York , NY 10003
WHEN:
Wednesday, November 28, 6:30pm8:30pm
 
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Place, Displacement, & The Politics of Housing

Alternate Visions: Bold Proposals for Housing New Yorkers

WHERE:
Museum of the City of New York
1220 Fifth Avenue New York, NY 10029
WHEN:
Thursday, December 6, 6:30pm8:30pm
 

 

Thursday, December 6 at 6:30 pm at the Museum of the City of New York

New York City is in the midst of an affordability crisis which poses an existential threat to the city’s characteristic vitality and diversity. Even during a time of rapid development in the affordable housing sector, many New Yorkers are being priced out the city and many more are struggling to pay the rent. Are existing plans to address the issue adequate, or is it time to consider more radical approaches? What are some big ideas for making New York housing more affordable?

Hear five distinct proposals — as diverse as the city itself — from thought-leaders and activists trying to reframe our current approach to housing. A discussion moderated by The Atlantic’sCityLab journalist Kriston Capps will follow.

This program is co-presented by CityLab. 

$20 & up | $15 for Museum Members. Register online at mcny.org/future. Use code HOUSING1 for discounted tickets!

RSVP
 

Events New Urban Politics and the Right To The City

Brazil in Crisis: Resistance and Solidarity in the 21st Century (Teach-in)

WHERE:
Institute for Public Knowledge
20 Cooper Square
5th Floor, New York , NY 10003
WHEN:
Wednesday, November 14, 11:00am2:00pm
 

Please join us for an urgent and open discussion on the recent election in Brazil that brought hard-right candidate Jaír Bolsonaro to the presidency. Drawing on the expertise of both NYU faculty and activists, we will address what this election means for academic freedom, social policy, human rights, the rule of law, environmental protections, and democracy in Brazil and in the region. In addition to presentations and video conferencing with activists in Brazil, we will dedicate part of the time to break-out sessions to think through and develop strategies to support solidarity work moving forward.

This event is free and open to the public. If you are unable to attend in person, you may follow the recording below:

 

Presented in partnership with: NYU’s Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics, Urban Democracy Lab, Institute for Public Knowledge, NACLA, and the Department of Spanish and Portuguese.

 

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Events New Urban Politics and the Right To The City

Debating U.S. National Security Whistleblowing: Secrets, the State, and Democracy, A Discussion with Whistleblowers, Advocates, and Historians

WHERE:
Jerry H. Labowitz Theatre for the Performing Arts
1 Washington Place
New York, NY , USA
WHEN:
Thursday, October 18, 4:00pm7:00pm
 

Are Edward Snowden, Reality Winner, and James Comey whistleblowers or leakers, heroes or traitors? Is WikiLeaks a media organization or a foreign agent? Is it ever appropriate to disclose official secrets to the public? Join us for a series of roundtable discussions featuring whistleblowers, advocates, and historians to debate the past, present, and future of national security whistleblowing. This event is organized by Hannah Gurman (NYU Gallatin) and Kaeten Mistry (University of East Anglia, UK) and is sponsored by the Urban Democracy Lab at NYU Gallatin, The Tamiment Institute Library at NYU, and the Arts and Humanities Research Council (UK).

Schedule

Introductions from Hannah Gurman (NYU Gallatin) and Kaeten Mistry (University of East Anglia, UK)

Historical Perspectives: The Origins, Evolution, and Legacy of National Security Whistleblowing

4:15-5:30 pm

Sam Lebovic (George Mason University); Chase Madar (NYU Gallatin); Jeremy Varon (The New School), and Julia Rose Kraut (The Historical Society of the New York Courts)

Break

5:30-5:45 pm

Whistleblowing Today: A Conversation with Whistleblowers and Advocates

5:45-7 pm

Thomas Drake (NSA Whistleblower); John Kiriakou (CIA Whistleblower); Brian Fleming (Miller & Chevalier); Barry Pollack (Robbins, Russell, Englert, Untereiner & Sauber)

For more information, go to: https://wp.nyu.edu/whistleblowing. This event is free and open to the public but an RSVP is requested.

 

Events Urban Humanities and Their Publics

THE BIG [QUEER] WALK

WHERE:
1 Washington Place
New York NY, USA
WHEN:
Saturday, October 13, 10:00am2:00pm
 
The BIG WALK, sponsored by the Gallatin School of Individualized Study at NYU, is an annual “walkingand talking” tour that traverses iconic New York City thoroughfares or focuses on certain neighborhoods. This year, we are exploring sites in lower Manhattan of special significance to the LGBTQ communities. The 2018 BIG [QUEER] WALK will be directed by Gallatin professor Louise Harpman and will include special guest curator Michael Ryan (BA ’14). The BIG [QUEER] WALK is co-sponsored by the Urban Democracy Lab and is free and open to the public. Reservations are required. This event is part of the ARCHTOBER celebration.

 

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Urban Humanities and Their Publics

Zoning and Urban Development

WHERE:
Jerry H. Labowitz Theatre for the Performing Arts
Washington Place
New York, NY , USA
WHEN:
Tuesday, March 6, 6:30pm8:00pm
 

What is zoning? Rezoning? How has it shaped NYC? How does development relate to climate change? Gentrification? Come talk about it! The Urban Democracy Lab’s Student Advisory Board is hosting a teach-in about zoning and urban development on March 6 from 6:30-8 PM in the Gallatin 5th Floor Lounge. The event will feature Jon RitterPaula CrespoZishun Ning, and Sam Stein as panelists. Listen to experts, ask questions, and contribute your knowledge to our discussion! The event will be moderated by Student Advisory Board member Jonathan Marty, and will be co-hosted by the Urban Design and Architecture Society. Snacks provided!

Panelists

Sam Stein: PhD student at CUNY, Professor of Urban Studies at Hunter College. Contributor to Jacobin Mag and the recent book Zoned Out!: Race, Displacement, and City Planning in New York City by Tom Angotti and Sylvia Morse.

Paula Crespo: Senior Planner at the Pratt Center for Community Development. Coordinator of the Center’s graduate student Fellowship program and the Taconic Fellowship

Zishun Ning: Founder of Youth Against Displacement, and organizer at the Chinese Staff and Workers Association

Jon Ritter: Clinical Associate Professor of Urban Design and Architecture at NYU. President of the New York Metropolitan Chapter of the Society of Architectural Historians