Place, Displacement, & The Politics of Housing

Visualizing Tenant Activism: A Workshop and Discussion

Map of New York City with red dots in the Harlem, Upper East Side, East Village, and Bushwick neighborhoods

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WHEN:
Monday, February 23, 6:30pm8:30pm
 

Housing, land use, and the rights of renters have become increasingly contested political terrains in an age of rapid gentrification. In this workshop, students from Studio 20, an innovative Master’s program at NYU’s Arthur L. Journalism Institute, and Chris Henrick, a cartographer pursuing an MFA in Design and Technology at Parsons, The New School for Design, share technological tools they have developed to aid tenants and tenant advocates in their fight to end displacement and protect affordable housing in New York. Studio 20’s web documentary, New York Tenants Project, uses video, audio, photography, and interactive storytelling to investigate the loss of approximately 300,000 rent regulated apartments in New York City. Chris Henrick’s projects explore how rent stabilization data can be used to help create awareness of rent regulation and tenants’ rights, most notably in his recent web site titled, Am I Rent Stabilized?

The Studio 20 Team is Jasmine Lee, Dmitry Melamed, Jacqui Devaney, Travis Mannon, Kasia Pilat, Madeline Welsh, Eric French, and Project Producer Clàudia Prat (@webDOCC) under the supervision of Multimedia Reporting Professor Jason Maloney.

Chris Henrick (@chrislhenrick), a Cartographer pursuing an MFA in Design and Technology at Parsons, The New School for Design. Chris was also part of a team that redesigned the North West Bushwick Community Map, a mapping project that seeks to provide local residents and community organizers with housing and urban planning data to help track the changes happening in Bushwick and to protect residents.

RSVP to urbandemos@nyu.edu

Please note: Seating is limited to 30 people, first come, first served.